PROJEKTE

PROJECTS

Es ist wieder soweit! Die Studierenden der KISD – Köln International School of Design veranstalten ihren jährlichen Rundgang, den KISDparcours, der die Abschlussarbeiten der diesjährigen Bachelor- und Master-Absolventinnen und -Absolventen und viele weitere über das Studienjahr entstandene Projekte der Öffentlichkeit präsentiert.

Einen Auszug der rund 150 Arbeiten gibt es hier bereits zu sehen!

It is that time of the year again. The students of KISD – Köln International School of Design, are presenting their annual school wide exhibition KISDparcours, including the works of Bachelor- Master Graduates and interesting projects of the year. Please have a look at an abstract of the round about 150 works!

Room 11/12: Master Thesis
ALINE ALONSO: COLLABORATIVE PLAYGROUND

Prof. Birgit Mager / service design

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The government is confronted with issues of increasing complexity such as climate change, migration and aging population, which challenge public sector bodies to innovate the ways they develop and deliver their services and policies.Over the past decade there has been increasing interest in design-based approaches such as user-centred design, user experience, service design and design thinking in public sector and government contexts, which can be applied to deliver public good in the format of well-designed services. In doing so with a systemic and human-centered perspective, design can transform the way public sector bodies approach public issues in a deeper way, such as building internal design capabilities and influencing the policy decision-making and implementation processes.
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Room 11/12: Master Thesis
MOHAMED HASAN: MAY I HAVE YOUR ATTENTION, PLEASE?

Prof. Birgit Mager / service design

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Cities are generating and using the unprecedented flow of information today. However, attention to this information is the new currency that is being used in the media as an essential core of the world’s capitalistic consumerism. Advertising is the most prominent and problematic phenomena that has clear and direct applied research on attention. With a focus on Out-of-Home (OOH) advertising in general and in Cologne specifically, this study aims – from a designer’s point of view – raise city commuters’ awareness towards the existence of OOH elements. The study also tries to establish an understanding of the term ‘attention’ for designers to use in their various practices.
www.attendtothis.com

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Room 11/12: master thesis
MARIANA LOURENCO: SOCIAL INTERACTIONS THROUGHT INSTALLATIONS: OUTSIDE THE WHITE CUBE

Prof. Andreas Muxel / Interface design

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This research explores the social catalyst potential of the exhibitions. The experiments pointed that social interaction and participation enhances the visitor experience for a deeper reflection about the content and connection to the local community. As a medium for messages, exhibitive spaces achieve it by using sensorial elements and symbols, while play with them in a specific time and space to communicate an intended content. Nonetheless, in the global village context, it is arguable whether different cultures are equally represented there. This research argument that display is provide voices to ideologies. Hence, the exhibitions can bridge cultures, and as a consequence, shape a more diverse cultural production in the context of the postcolonial and globalized world.

This argument question the ideology of the “White Cube” as neutral space, conceptualized by Brian O’Doherty, which is still the mainstream approach for an exhibitive space: introspective, top-down, institutionalized, elitist. As a way to subvert this structure, this research proposes that the role of the curator, exhibition designer and installation artist to be blended. As a consequence, it fosters social innovation and intercultural exchange, not only through design of participation, but also through participatory design.

The participatory method served as the access to a minority group in Cologne: the Syrian & Kurd refugees. They were approached through Workshops and a Toolkit, exploring their Identity and Feeling of belonging. It intended to understand the group, build a community and curate the content through dialog. As a final experiment, the exhibition “Where is home?” was designed and curated for the TH Köln celebration of the World Refugee Day, a date established by the UNHCR to foster discussion around the world. As a result, seven installations were developed, inspired by relational art:
Tree of Wishes, In/Outside of the box, Invented borders, Papyrus, Postcard, Music, Around the table.

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Room 11/12: Bachelor thesis
Hannes Hummel: CO/LAB – Entwicklung einer
kollaborativen VR-Simulations

Prof. Björn Bartholdy / Audiovisual Media

Room 11/12: Bachelor thesis
Annika Mechelhoff: glitch_identities

Prof. em dr. Uta Brandes / Gender & design

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The photo project “Glitch_Identities” shows the positioning of queerness within society. It shows several portraits with focus on queer-fashion, -makeup and -hair. When not long ago “queer” was an insulting word for calling someone “gay” or rather “dykey” or “faggoty”, one could say that today – thanks to feminism – “queer” became a descriptive term for people who don’t identify with the “normal” gender systems of the majorly heteronormative society. Even though the scene became more established, being queer still appears as a footnote of social life. On the one hand, the portraits show that queer-fashion already is part of regular urban life. On the other hand, the project exposes the still controversial discourse of breaking visual gender stereotypes and dress codes. It focuses the social notion that queerness and the LGBTQ*-culture is somehow still seen as outbursts of heteronormative “reality”. Queer-dressing people are mostly perceived as disturbance of aesthetic normativity. Thereby this attitude misses the point that the system just can be noticed as “working” by creating unplanned glitches. Glitch art got a big hype through the last years. It questions the social standards of beauty and truth. The glitch portraits are created through data bending converted audio files of the digital photographies. They will be published on instagram.com/glitch_identities as three-part portraits and as animated video
glitch art.

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Room 11/12: Bachelor thesis
David Hoffmann + Lukas Rauen:
An application for the design of leisure activities

Prof. Andreas Muxel / Interface design

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As a result of the increasing spread of social media platforms, cooperations with event-organizers and leisure activities, the Internet frequently offers more opportunities to get information on the latest events en route. In most cases, however, the user is only offered a short teaser or a photo of the event without a deeper insight. Our thesis includes the concept of a service for the design of leisure activities. The resulting brand daynite© evolves from the market analysis of competing products. In order to counter the superficial promotion of events, our service offers the user the opportunity, to get a deeper insight in events of interest in advance. This is achieved through the development of a web application with virtual reality components.

The creation of modern content, such as 360 degree videos and VR environments, can be experienced in a unique way using MobileVR compatible devices and VR headsets such as the Google Daydream. We want to give interested parties the opportunity to get a deeper insight into events, adventuers and other leisure activities in general – regardless of the current time and place. Thereby we offer an immersive live experience preview. The service can be accessed via any conventional web browser, thus benefiting a broad user base. The resulting place-independent usage is a clear objective of the concept and is closely linked to the immersive component of the MobileVR technology. The emerging technologies from the field of virtual reality have so far been limited to static interactions of the user with the medium. The prototypical development of this application, incorporating modern MobileVR concepts, is intended to demonstrate the possibilities and the independence of the user with regard to future technological advances in the field of VR.

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Room 11/12: Bachelor thesis
Mara Siegel: Parallelwelten

Prof. Dr. Carolin Höfler / Design Theory & research

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The cities of our era are characterized by continuous changes and transformations. This is mainly due to the fact that more and more people are moving from villages to the cities because they are hoping for a better life, or because they escape from miserable conditions in their homes. These flows of people are changing the locations in which they flow and those from which they have sprung. One third of the world‘s population moves from the country to the cities passing provinces, countries, and continents on their way. The people who want to integrate themselves in a new city are usually an important ecological and social factor within the city of arrival. Whether in the cities of arrival, new cultural influences form parallel societies which operate independently and without relation to the connecting city, or whether the strangers are integrated into the socio-economic situation of the city, often depends on the already existing condition of the arrival city.

In the final thesis, I am examining urban areas, which were characterized by immigration, following my proposals for the utopia of architecture and the decisive design factors of prisons. In doing so, I will point out the design features that these city districts have and what they suggest. The question arises whether the people of these city districts are excluded from the surrounding city by their different cultural background, or interacted with it. Have these people designed a utopia in which they live according to their ideas, or have they built themselves a prison that they cannot leave from? Where are the connecting points that link them with the city and what do they look like? Through observations and surveys in three different Chinatowns of the American East Coast, I examine the motion in these urban spaces, taking into account migration, tourism and commuter movements, and then create analytical visualization diagrams that show how people shape their space and space its people.

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Room 11/12: Bachelor thesis
Franziska Volmer: Harder, Better, Faster , Stronger?

Prof. Iris Utikal / Typography & Layout

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Automated and standardized processes have often been integrated unnoticed into our daily lives, to create life easier and more efficient. Can such processes also be used profitably in the graphic design area? What are the possibilities? How do we deal with sophisticated software and automated functions as graphic designers in the future? What will be the role of the designer? Do automatic processes open up more possibilities or do they rather restrict them?

The state-of-the-art technology makes it impossible to fully automate graphic design. Creativity, as well as intelligence can only be exercised in a so-called weak form by a computer. A system can reproduce what it has learned and apply it to something new. However, to automate the entire graphic design, the machine lacks the intention, its own will, the intention of creating. However, tools and parts of the design work can be automated. In my work, I have experimented with the results of this automation. I have tested and used various automation methods to try out their potential for the simplification of the design process and as a new way of developing ideas. The world is changing faster than ever, and so is the area of the designer. Creatives must constantly learn new things, try new techniques. New contexts require new tools. In our technological world, therefore, dealing with algorithms and automation in graphic design is essential for the future of the design profession.

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Room 11/12: Bachelor thesis
Joana Francener: As artificial as it gets

Prof. Andreas Muxel / Interface Design

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During my undergraduate years at the Köln International School of Design, I was confronted with an infinite amount of opportunities to focus on as a designer. Very quickly I was drawn into the Service Design expertise and pleasantly overwhelmed with the many possibilities and facets this area of design integrates. Within the broad spectrum of areas a service designer can benefit to be fluent in, I was drawn to interaction design, trying to better grasp the relationship between people and technology.

My final project deals with a relatively new form of interaction with machines, namely Voice User Interfaces (VUIs). Speech is inherently natural to human beings, starting as early as in the womb. Before birth babies are already capable of recognizing the mothers voice among other ones. The very nature of this medium and the capacity of the human brain to make sense out of sounds, makes the relationship with a speaking machine quite complex and more prone to anthropomorphization than any other type of interface. Raising several questions regarding the human/machine relationship.

While designing, the medium may become more or less visible depending on its purpose. As new media emerge, new guidelines must be created in order to shape the way people interact with them. By researching the topic of VUIs and how to design for them, many guidelines regard attributes inherent to machines, such as efficiency, contextuality and precision. However, several other attributes that are prescribed by experts in the field, are innately human, i.e.: natural response, intonation, and what is called intuitive design.

This bachelor thesis questions the nature of VUIs, their role when it comes to assisting human beings and the (illusion of) relationships one may be experiencing with a set of algorithms. The technology and services are so advanced that the ubiquitous interface is no longer noticed unless summoned. Is the deep integration of the medium headed to a scenario in which Virtual Personal Assistants will be so close to the individuum, that one may trust them with intimate secrets? Or should the designer’s task be indeed to walk the fine line of efficiency for the product’s audience, gently reminding them of the synthetic nature of the assistant?

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Room 11/12: Bachelor thesis
Julia Antista: Hikikomori – concept and realization of a gif-animation series

Prof. Nina Juric / Image & Motion

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“Hikikomori“ is a phenomenon where young people choosing there own isolation by shutting themselves in from the society. Instead they staying at home and don’t leaving there room. Each gif is focused on a different problem inside the phenomenon and placed on this webpage which is like a digital reading-book where the female protagonist named “H.“ is sharing her memories before the actual withdrawal, but also current experience in status Hikikomori. It should express a snap-shot of a Hikikomori life, like the door of its room is just opening for a little sight.
In total the gif animations contains on 600 hand drawn pictures.

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Room 11/12: Bachelor thesis
Christian Nufer: Development of a Democratization Approch to Designing Corporate Identity

Prof. Andreas Wrede / Identity & Design

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„It‘s a great time for design“. The economic value and cultural influence of design seems to have been understood more than ever in organizations of all kinds. This is true not only for digital pioneers like Google, Apple or Facebook. From more conservative business consultancies to banks and financial firms to retailers – all players are increasingly buying or expanding their design skills. These are no longer confined to the design of aesthetic surfaces, but are considered as „tools of transformation, capable of changing the way in which companies act, recruit, compete, and build their brand“.

Inadequate, however, appears to be the authoritarian top-down principle, which is followed by corporate identity and branding concepts. Behavioral and communication methods are centrally defined in a small group of people and ‚implemented‘ into the organization concerned. Designers are typified as experts and employees as laymen. At this point, design is by no means emphatic; the design does not follow the demands of its users, its users have to follow the design. More and more complex management systems are forcing constraints and enforcing compliance while limiting the creativity, flexibility, and innovative capacity of employees. In addition, local problem-solving can not always be carried out within these patterns; just think of the multiplicity of ever-changing channels and media.

Last but not least, the high level of control itself is an economic disadvantage of such authoritarian design and management practice. It can be traced back to a rational-technocratic idea of companies in which elements can be decoupled from each other and viewed individually. In system and organization theory, however, companies are not described as perfectly organized instruments, but as complex social fabrics. A company, on the one hand, is part of human society, and on the other hand is itself a society, a union of people with all their human irrationality and emotion. Multilateral dependencies exist everywhere and can hardly be visualized in the usual flowcharts. Corporate Identity should be understood as an integrative concept that describes these phenomena; the interconnectedness of all the problems, relations, and dependencies.

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Room 11/12: constructed and grown
Janno Ströker: reduce air pollution
through biointegration

Prof. Hatto Grosse / Design for Manufacturing

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Fine dust pollution is an ever-increasing problem in urban areas. In 2016, the limit values were exceeded by far in almost every large city in Germany. Fine dust is invisible – and a threat to health. It can cause headache, dizziness and even dyspnea. If the concentration is too high, stroke risk increases significantly as the fine particles can reach blood vessels through our lungs. From driving bans, to road cleaning and filter systems, cities are continuously looking for ways to improve air quality.
A new approach is the air purifying effect of moss, which is currently being tested in large-scale projects around Stuttgart or Berlin. Moss’ particular characteristics qualify it greatly: within its small size, moss has a huge surface; a moss cushion of one square meter comes with up to five million smallest leaflets. Each of these leaflets attracts dust electrostatically. The moss is thereby negatively charged, while particles in the fine dust are positive. Since moss has no root system, it needs to absorb nutrients from the air. For this reason, moss does not only hold on to the dangerous particles – it even takes the dust via their leaves and digest it. The fine dust becomes biomass.

Based on my research proposal on the principle of biointegration – the combination of conventional materials and construction methods with the dynamic properties of organic processes – the intention was to make these purifying properties of moss usable for interior spaces. Indoor less powerful dilution effects are produced than in the outside air, resulting in often higher fine dust loads in interiors than in outside areas. Furthermore, the dust concentration is often considerably increased by means of additional sources of emissions such as office equipment, vacuum cleaners or even cooking and frying.

The result of this work is a filter system concept for residential areas that cleans the air of fine dust with the help of moss. By a stream of air, the dust is passed past the moss and adheres to the moss surface by electrostatic charge. Since moss draws everything, also its water requirements, out of the air, it is dependent on high humidity and can not be poured as usual. For this purpose, water is nebulized by ultra- sonic, resulting in a constant artificial humidity is in the filter system. The system acts autonomously and adaptably through the aid of a micro controller, making it highly efficient.

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409 Computer lab:
Reconnecting Things

Prof. Andreas Muxel / Interface design

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Considering the impact of digitalization on our daily lives traditional analog objects increasingly become obsolete and be replaced with “smarter” things. But instead of replacing “old” and “unused” artifacts we might also think in adapters to reconnect to the digital world. Therefore the project “Reconnecting Things” started with a clear task:
Design an adapter that allows an analog object to be re-used in a digital and connected environment.

In the beginning the students were asked to observe and document interactions with analog and digital artifacts in daily routines. An archive of everyday interactions and things was established and used for further discussions. In a next step first prototypes of adapters were built and tested to experience possible scenarios.

“Reconnecting things” shows a series of small objects – adapters for already existing, analog things to be re-used in a digital and connected environment. By creating new contexts for these ordinary objects, the six individual projects playfully explore scenarios and interactions around themes like the conditioning of human habits, the translation of consequences or known communication principles from digital to analog, rituals for the digital death, as well as artificial diffusion as a new approach to data security.

For example by flipping a glass cup the “Memory Catcher” acts as an analog adapter to record and play voice memos. “Schizophrenia of Things” offers a series of objects producing fake data to blur the digital profile, as our physical environment reads, collects and stores an increasing amount of user information. The project „I do have a minute“ explores the consequences of an analog „progress bar“. The “Break Forcing Machine“ forces people to take a break even if they do not want to. The “Book Blaster” augments a nostalgic handheld game to a mixed reality environment. In the project the virtual ball of the arcade game “Breakout” hits analog books. The project “Hello. We existed.” offers a speculative scenario to leave something behind for future terrestrial life – a relic that tells what and who we were in our digital era.

Participants: Filipi Dias de Oliveira, Felix Paul Zelck, Katja Trinkwalder, Li-Yeh Lin, Pia-Marie Stute, Sophie Marlene Sonja Sanchez, Shiqi Zhang, Tanja Gisela Müller, Theresa Stefanie Magdalena Tropschuh

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Im Rahmen unserer Zusammenarbeit mit Firma Balloni, erreichte die KISD im Spätherbst 2016 eine Art Hilferuf. Im Rahmen einer Jubiläumsfeier der Papierfabrik WEPA- ein sogenannter „Hidden Champion“ – sollte eine Modenschau stattfinden, in der Kleider und Kostüme aus Materialien der Firma– Papier in jeder Form – vorgeführt würden.

Zwar gibt es die Fachrichtung Modedesign nicht an der KISD, doch die Herausforderung klang so großartig, dass das Projekt angenommen wurde. Auf die von Professor Laubersheimer in den KISDSpaces gepostete Anfrage meldeten sich über 20 Studierende. Anspruchsvolle Projekte wie diese erfreuen sich großer Beliebtheit an der KISD. Damit dennoch etwas Textil-gestalterische Expertise an Bord war, wurde Gewandmeisterin Alide Büld –Kostümbildernin unteran

Bei einem ersten Kennenlerntreffen mit WEPA in Arnsberg wurde schnell die Dimension des Vorhabens deutlich, denn 10 – 15 Kostüme sollten gestaltet und vorgeführt werden. Spannend war allerdings zu sehen, wie viele Formen von Papier WEPA produzierte. Schon eine Woche später kam der LKW aus Arnsberg gefüllt mit Bergen von Papierrollen, Pappe, Softpaper, Servietten, Küchenkrepp in allen Varianten und Variationen und an der KISD entladen. Der Zeitplan war knappgehalten, nach der Anlieferung blieben vier Wochen bis zur Modenschau. Und dann ging es los: Auf Kleiderpuppen wurden Küchenkreppkreationen drapiert, Pappe wurde auf dem Lasercutter zur „Brüsseler“-Spitze, rote Papierservietten wurden zu Rosenknospen gefaltet und auf Papierreifröcke geklebt. Das Projekt wuchs und wuchs und wuchs. Vorlagen waren schwer zu finden, denn Papierkostüme sind eher eine Seltenheit. KISD-typisch wurde es ein „learning by doing“ Projekt. War die Auftraggeberin beim ersten Besuch noch extrem skeptisch, waren die Lippen beim zweiten und dritten Termin doch nicht mehr ganz so stark aufeinandergepresst. Und dann kam der Tag der Modenschau. Über 20 KISDies fuhren im „Tourbus“ nach Hamm, dem Ort der Jubiläumsfeier. In einem Zelt vor der Veranstaltungshalle wurde geschminkt, frisiert, drapiert, ausgebessert, getackert, geklebt, genäht und geprobt. Am späten Abend war es so weit und der Vorhang ging auf. 14 Kostüme wurden in einer mehrmals geprobten und selbst-choreografierten Schau vorgeführt.

Die Fotos zeigen eine kleine Auswahl der Modelle und es ist zu sehen, dass die Studierenden neben der traditionellen Mittel Mode zu gestalten auch moderne Technologien eingesetzt haben und wunderbar mit Emotionen gespielt haben. Die Modenshow war der Höhepunkt des Abends und die Beifallsovationen wollten nicht enden. Wie so oft, hat sich auch hier gezeigt, dass KISD Studierende in der Lage sind große Herausforderungen mit Bravour zu meistern und unteranderem diese Qualität unsere Studenten als gute Designer auszeichnet.

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409 Computer lab:
Visual Music – Chablis: „Purity & Minerality“

Prof. Nina Juric / Image & Motion

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An extraordinary opportunity and colaboration was coming up in the image & motion department at the summerterm 2017. Together with our new cooperation partners Bureau Interprofessionelle des Vins de Bourgogne (BIVB) – the wine association from the special region Chablis in France- seven high-conceptional visual music pieces have been realized.

Between end of april till beginning of july 2017 14 students worked in audiovisual teams on this high conceptual video competition. The topic was “Purity & Minerality” – of course in context of Chablis vines – and was stylisticly all about high aesthetical concepts, artistic storytelling and abstract stagings of images in synergy with sound – so calles Visual Music pieces.

Participants:
Michael Möckel & Marcel Müller / Lisa Peter & Sophie Charlotte Bertzen / João Coutinho & Hei Wa Wong / Hendrik Hajo Vohs & Dominik Schmitz / Johannes Matthias Mechler & Christoph Luckas Beckers / Nima Hülshorst & May Arryan Bachtiar / Alejandro Mirena & Clara Emma Fee Schramm

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What is the “audiovisual character” of a thing? How can we sensually invent, re-interpret, and transform it within the context of a band? In December 2016, students of KISD became “The Hacking Orchestra” and digged deeper into the »principles of misuse« of objects and explored the modes of »instant playing«. The “Hacking Orchestra” invited its students and the public to an audiovisual live set on December 9, 2016 at KISD. And as it should be for a real band – there were blenders mixed, wardrobes kicked, razors effected, referee high seats sensorized, marbels synthesized, water amplified, and TVs destroyed.

“The Hacking Orchestra” is a project set up of a wired sound park of found objects, supervised by Prof. Nina Juric and Prof. Andreas Muxel. Students from diverse semesters hacked everyday objects in unusual ways in order to explore their pitch singularities. They enhanced experiences on improvisation with hardware and software. They designed different inputs and outputs, creating circuits, translations, compositions, and notations. They discovered live dramaturgy and proved the affordance of space. In only ten days, they had to find and act together as dialoguing futurists and bizarre musicians.

“From the beginning the students had to focus not only to play and hack, but also to listen to and find ways to interact with each other. For us setting up a band is a vehicle for enhancing communication. Jamming from the beginning – the instant playing mode- was an essential part to force interaction between the band members,” says Prof. Muxel.

“The band is not just the music. It sounds easy to jam, but it is quite a big challenge to bring all the elements to a live act in ten days. Creating an impact and an experience for all senses means every detail – like sound, composition, performance, stage, light, objects and its aesthetics- has to be contextualized with each other,” says Prof. Juric. Please find additional pictures of the project, the album “noise pattern”, and a film of the live performance on www.thehackingorchestra.com.

The band can now be booked on booking@thehackingorchestra.com.

Participants: Dino Jin Tanaka, Dieter Pilger, Jakob Plöns, Kyosuke Ishii, Martin Samuel Simpson, Stefanie Grawe,
Hamza Mahfouz

Teaching assistant: Manuel Alejandro Juarez Saucedo

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image1 ASMR? Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response is a physical sensation characterized by a pleasurable tingling, that typically begins in the head and scalp, and often moves down the spine and through the limbs. In this project, we felt out for the audiovisual phenomenon. The aim was to design our own ASMR Channel and produce conceptual ASMR media. Here we go! Enjoy!

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Being a part of the KISDparcours 2017, KISD will on July 20 also host the exhibition PERFORMATIVE BODIES which will be challenging our parameters of interaction. PERFORMATIVE BODIES approaches the borders of bodies and behavior; of materiality and movement; of self-conception and manipulation. As a cooperative work of designers, composers, and musicians, 15 students from KISD and HfMT re-define our view on performativity. Theories on gender and social structures constitute a central aspect of this exploration.
Each visitor’s contact with the installations will be unique – and might question our perception of society and technology … Right now – are you performing? We are not.

What means “performative“ in the context of our daily environment? And by which criteria do we define theterm “body“? In the context of the KISDparcours, the PERFORMATIVE BODIES will give answers.

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Weltweit stehen Städte vor gewaltigen Herausforderungen einer besonderen Urbanisierungsdynamik: unkontrolliertes Wachstum, Verlust öffentlichen Raumes, Migrationgsströme, hybrider Extremismus. Der Journalist und Autor Doug Saunders beschreibt in „Arrival City“ die gewaltigen Veränderungen der Städte. In analytisch-experimenteller Weise setzen sich die Studierenden mit den physischen Anordnungen und Materialitäten der Städte, ihren Akteuren, Praktiken und Infrastrukturen auseinander. Sie entwickeln visuelle Systeme zu Ursachen, Erscheinungen und Wirkungen der Ankunftsstädte.

Cities around the globe face tremendous challenges with regard to the dynamics of urbanization: a growth out of control, a loss of public space, heavy migration flows, a hybrid extremism. In “Arrival Cities”, the journalist Doug Saunders illustrates the massive consequences that these migration flows entailed for cities. Students discussed analytically and experimented with the physical arrangements and materialities of these cities and its players, practices, and infrastructures. They developed tools and visual concepts for the causes, occurrences, and effects of such arrival cities.

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Room 232:
Service Design im öffentlichen Sektor

Prof. Birgit Mager / Service Design

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Der öffentliche Sektor dient allen Bürgerinnen und Bürgern, und er ist weltweit der größte Arbeitgeber. Die Veränderungsgeschwindigkeit, mit der er heute konfrontiert ist, ist enorm: Neue Technologien haben einen starken Einfluss auf das, was und wie der öffentliche Sektor Dienstleistungen für Bürger*innen bereitstellt. Die Erwartungen von Bürgern verändern sich kontinuierlich, zudem haben Erfahrungen mit privatwirtschaftlichen Dienstleistungen Einfluss auf die Erwartungen, die sich an den öffentlichen Sektor richten. Dienstleistungen werden auf den unterschiedlichsten Kanälen in gleichbleibender Qualität erwartet. Transparenz, Geschwindigkeit, Wahlmöglichkeiten, Individualisierung – diese Erfahrungen werden zu Erwartungen. Dazu kommt der ökonomische Druck auf den öffentlichen Dienst: mehr Leistungen in besserer Qualität für weniger Geld – ein vertracktes Problem! Während der letzten Jahrzehnte hat sich die Rolle von Design kontinuierlich verändert.

Die in der breiten Öffentlichkeit noch immer vorhandene Vorstellung, dass Design für das Schöne, für das Styling oder die Produktkosmetik zuständig sei, ist längst obsolet. Heute spielt Design eine maßgebliche Rolle im Umgang mit komplexen Problemen. Organisationen versuchen die Fähigkeiten von Designern zu nutzen, um über das Gegebene hinauszuwachsen und eine andere Art zu denken und zu arbeiten in ihre Systeme zu bringen. Die Zusammenarbeit zwischen dem öffentlichen Dienst und Service-Design-Instituten an Hochschulen eröffnet Experimentierräume und die Möglichkeit für öffentliche Dienstleister, mit den Arbeitsweisen des Service Design erste Erfahrungen zu machen. So arbeitet die Stadt New York mit der Parsons-Universität zusammen, in Finnland ist es die Aalto University, die Verwaltungsmitarbeiter*innen anhand konkreter Projekte im Service Design qualifiziert – um nur einige wenige zu nennen –, und in Köln ist es die Köln International School of Design, die hier mit dem Österreichischen Parlament zusammengearbeitet hat, um erste Erfahrungen zum Service Design in die Organisation einzubringen – ein interdisziplinäres Projekt, in dem Mitarbeiter*innen der Verwaltung, Absolvent*innen des C+ Lehrgangs in Service Design und Studierende der KISD gemeinsam die Schnittstellen zwischen Bürger*innen, Parlamentsorganisation und den Mandatar*innen exploriert und dabei Innovationspotenziale identifiziert und ausgearbeitet haben, die im Kontext der Renovierung des Österreichischen Parlaments implementiert werden können.

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“Grün Säen” combines several projects at KISD on the topic of “School, Garden, Design (School Garden)” undertaken over the course of various semesters. The projects were offered in a number of disciplines at KISD, for example Typography and Layout and Design Concepts, and were realized in cooperation with the Institute for Biology and Didactics of the University of Cologne. They were supported and sponsored by the RheinEnergie Stiftung.

The book project ran for two semesters. Students developed the concept and layout and were assigned to do research on all project results and to compile them into appropriate, reasonable chapters. Many drafts had to be arranged into new models for a professional
photo shoot. For the cover design, there was a special project workshop in which it was students’ task, alongside drafting the cover, to design fictitious book jackets out of specified materials. Four distinct topics were given: a crime story, a romantic novel, DIY, and science-fiction.

The actual cover was developed over the course of two weeks and was finally presented at a KISD Friday presentation. Participants were free to choose the materiality, but were given specified formats for front size and spine thickness. In doing so, 16 possible ideas were collected which partly referred to the school garden concepts and re-interpreted them through typographic approaches. Through using the laser cutter, these solutions eventually became haptic experiences. It was the experimental approach to be paramount objective in the project.

Participants: Deniz Balkaya, Marius Barzyncki, Lisa Daughtrey, Eugen Herber, Timo Horbach, Sibel Huz,Kevork Kojayan, Nima Hülshorst, Thomas Klimek, Sophie Marlene Sonja Sanchez, Julia Sowada, Barbara Christina Stöhr, Rozsa Szalontai, Christian Weeke

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